Home > RDX (Molecule of the Month for March 2007 )

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Picture of RDX

C3 H6 N6 O6

RDX is an explosive nitroamine widely used in military and industrial applications. In its pure, synthesized state RDX is a white, crystalline solid. As an explosive it is usually used in mixtures with other explosives and plasticizers or desensitizers. It is stable in storage and is considered one of the most powerful and brisant of the military high explosives. RDX forms the base for a number of common military explosives: Composition A, Composition A5, Composition B, Composition C, Composition D, HBX, H-6, Cyclotol and C4.

RDX was widely used during World War II, often in explosive mixtures with TNT such as Torpex. RDX was used in one of the first plastic explosives. RDX is believed to have been used in many bomb plots including terrorist plots.

It is obtained by reacting concentrated nitric acid with hexamine.

Formal Chemical Name (IUPAC)
1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine

References

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RDX

Update by Karl Harrison
(Molecule of the Month for March 2007 )